How Boundless Labs ups email revenue from 0% to 30% a month

Zach Johnson

Dylan Carpenter

Chase Dimond

Episode
02
|
Season 1

Chase Dimond

,

Partner

How to generate thousands of sales.

Since launching Boundless Labs in 2018, Diamond has helped his agency’s clients send hundreds of millions of emails resulting in over $40 million in email attributable revenue for high-profile clients like The Chive, IBEX, Original Grain, TUSHY and Vinyl Me Please.

Key Takeaways

  • Why testimonials suck compared to the social proof power of these platforms.
  • How one Facebook ad ended up driving 60% of a client’s revenue.
  • How to solve catastrophic mobile app email mistakes from the top down.
  • The absolute best incentive to get customers to leave favorable reviews -- it’s not what you think it is.
  • What you can do to get out of your agency echo-chamber and into the mind and buying motivations of your best customers.

The Transcript

Season 1
,
Episode
02
Transcript

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

Cool, cool. How's it going everybody? Welcome to another episode of Rich Ad, Poor Ad. Today we have one of my buddies Chase Diamond online. He is one of the partners at Boundless Labs. He is the Chief email marketing (guy) --  done roughly $35 million plus in revenue for his clients, all via email marketing. So while we dive into the ad side, we're going to be mixing in some emails with this as well. They have some good email practices, bad email practices, and kind of all the shenanigans get involved there. But hey, Chase, thanks for hopping on today. I would love to have you dive into a little bit about what you're doing.  A little background there so people have some kind of insights there.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond 

Yeah, appreciate you guys having me. Thank you. 


Host:  Zach Johnson  Definitely. 


Guest: Chase Diamond   Awesome. So yeah, currently  run Boundless Labs, we're a team of about 12 people and we're specifically focused on email marketing for e-commerce. So full service email marketing agency, we work with about 35 to 40 clients right now. Most are selling seven and eight figure brands, an email typically accounts for about 20% to 30% of these brands’ revenue. So it's pretty significant. So at a high level, that's kind of what I do. And that's what I'm up to today.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter 

Oh, man, that's awesome. When it comes to a lot of the brands you take on, what percent of revenue are they sitting at originally versus kind of once you get your little wheels  spinning over there to end up at?

 

Guest: Chase Diamond   

Yeah, so let's say we kind of run the gamut. Some brands literally are doing almost next to nothing, right? So their email attributable revenues are sitting anywhere from like zero to maybe like 3%, right? So it's very minimal. And then some other brands that come to us or maybe doing 10% to 15%. They kind of feel like they've done everything that they've can, and they don't know what they don't know, right? So they're looking to bring in a second pair of eyes and ears and to bring in some experts to help them. 

So typically anywhere from just starting out to maybe 10% to 15% on the high end, and definitely over the course of maybe three to six months of working together, we're pretty consistently able to get these brands to be doing 20%, 25%, 30% of their revenue. 

And again, that's not for every brand, right? We've got some brands that are doing well higher, some brands are doing 40%, 50%, 60% of the revenue from email. And some brands are also doing 10% or 15%. Right? Maybe they started at zero. So it really just depends, but on average, it's about 20%  to 30% of the revenue coming from email after a couple months.

Host:  Dylan Carpenter 

That makes total sense. And what's the size of these kinds of businesses you are working with? Or have they been around the block a little bit?  What's the lifeline or timeline of the businesses you're working with there?

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

Yeah, so in e-commerce, I think we've probably touched almost every single vertical. Everything from like CBD to skincare to haircare apparel, to fashion to jewelry, accessories, you name it. Most of our brands do in the ballpark of about one to $20 million in annual revenue. And they typically have been around anywhere from maybe nine months on the short end, all the way up to five, seven, maybe even 10 years for some businesses. So again, like it's that's really what I love about the industry that we all work in is that some of these brands become this overnight success and other brands that could have been more established and are growing steadily. So it's really fun to have this really well rounded kind of mixture.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

Oh, man, I love that. So I mean, from your point of view, what's been one of the funnest clients to work with? One you've had a lot of free reign on their messaging or you've been able to have fun with their copy. What's one of those dream clients you've been able to obtain over there?


Guest: Chase Diamond 

So for me, if you guys are familiar with The Chive, by any chance, they're like the men's millennial site.  They're really popular.  Not that they're not popular today, but they're really popular when we were like, maybe in middle school or high school. You guys know The Chive?  Like The Chive for me and all my buddies growing up, obviously, you know, as young dudes, it was like this coolest site ever, right?

Like, oh, man, that'd be such a fun company to work for one day. And somehow, in 2018, I got connected with their chief strategy officer. We had hit it off and I've been consulting with them ever since. 

So I work with them specifically on their e-commerce brand The Chivery. They're an eight figure e-commerce brand really leveraging the cult-like following of The Chive and they create tons of cool graphic tees and apparel and coins and they have really great partnerships with like Bill Murray and other people. So for me just growing up kind of like looking at this brand as like, “Oh, this is so cool”. And now being at a place where they look to me to  advise and consult them on email related practices --  has been really rewarding and fulfilling.

 

Host:  Zach Johnson

Oh The Chivery and  Bill Murray -- like you can't like can't go wrong with that. I wonder if there were any like failures when they were rolling that out? Because like I feel like that's been such a win.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond   

Yeah, I don't know too much about that partnership. It was kind of a lap around before I got involved, but from what I've seen and what I've heard, like, you know, Bill is such a great guy that to your point I got a great partnership. Every year they do a golf tourney together that just looks like absolute madness, right?  Like, it looks like the best time ever. So I gotta imagine they probably had some things that haven't gone their way. But they've had a lot of things that certainly have gone their way.  So hats off to them.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

Oh yeah. And I would even imagine he breaks into a whole new market for them when it comes to their audiences. So that's super snazzy there. But sweet. Let's get down to business. We'll be having some of these actual ads, email screenshots all within the kind of show notes for the  podcast description. But let's go ahead and dive into some of these top ads and top emails.  

I believe we have a brand, Calming Blanket, where we have the ad below some special offers and how it ties into email leaving some killer reviews on the ads and how it affected acquisition costs. 

So we'd love to kind of dive into your top ads for the Calming Blankets as well as the kind of strategy behind it. And  how you incorporated the email side of it, because the way you explained it earlier, it's quite a game changer.  I feel like many brands could implement this and do some wonders there. 


Host:  Zach Johnson  

Chase, tell us, tell us what's the Rich Ad, man.  Lay it on us.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

Awesome. So, yeah, I'm just gonna start actually really quickly one step back with what we did and why we did it. So, this brand, Calming Blankets, they're basically a weighted blanket that you could know wear as kind of a “hug”.  That you could sleep with to help you feel grounded and calm. So again, they can't say these things in their ads, but it's really around helping people with anxiety or people that have some kind of fear or some impulse for attention and need for care and love, right.

So these blankets, they range from about $200 to $300, maybe $400 in price. And this company was doing really, really well initially just running ads top of the funnel. And we had the idea kind of jointly on if we could leverage the traffic from email of people that have purchased to send that traffic to different ads every week to different ads every month. Different ads every quarter.  We got to imagine that we could increase the social proof, organically, which would then tie into the added of so just really quickly finishing up on this email and then we'll go into the ad piece. 

We basically sent an email about two weeks after someone had received their item. Just saying, “Hey, so we'd love to have you share a comment on a recent Facebook post about how your purchase has improved your life. Please include an image please including video, include a sentence, we'd really love to hear from you. And if you do this, we're actually going to get you entered in this sweepstakes to win a free king or queen weighted blanket which is worth $349.” 

So basically, we're incentivizing the people that purchased  to leave a review on this ad.  And to your point, it helps decrease the cost of acquisition. So now that you have the story, talk about the  ads that sound good.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

Yeah, let's totally do a quick run though. What was the opening click through rate on the actual emails themselves

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

So, off memory, I was looking at this preparing for tonight, I want to say the open rate was about 53%.  Click through was 4%  or 5%. And this was at scale. They're getting thousands and thousands of people every month. So it really does add up over time.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

Oh, yeah. Especially being on ads. I mean, all you all you need are like four or five of those bad boys, and it'll do wonders there.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

So I've got two ads that I’ll add as a screenshot that you guys could see in the show notes. These were two of the dozens of ads that we sent traffic to and send comments to over the course of about a year of working with this brand. 

So looking at this first ad, basically, the ad had a review from someone from a customer, right? So we basically had all these people leaving ads, reviews, and then we made one of those reviews actually into an ad itself. And then we started sending other people to this review. And people were like, “Oh, I want to enter my comment, I want to enter my thing too, because I want to win this blanket.   I want my comment and my thing featured on Facebook ads”. And basically, it was this really great quote that we got about how, when this lady used this blanket, she felt so much calmer. 

And then we offered this discount code of save $90 with code WINTER right? So we were running this one over the holidays, this one's a little bit older of an ad. But this ad was really where they spent a lot of their traffic and therefore a lot of their conversions came from.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter 

Yeah, that makes total sense there. Any idea on what kind of revenue those ads brought in or how the results have changed? I know you mentioned the acquisition costs kind of dropped there, but any kind of figures on the full spectrum of the numbers side of things.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

So I don't have a specific number in terms of like, what the acquisition cost actually was or what that looks like, but this company was doing about seven figures a month in revenue and majority of their revenue outside of the email. Email probably accounted for 20% to 25% of it. Majority of the revenue came from their Facebook, Instagram, and a little bit of Google, but mainly Facebook and Instagram, right? So this ad across the other ads they had, I got to imagine probably was driving 60% of their revenue.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

Oh, wow. And so they're really only using a couple ads at a time. But those ads were just super flavorful on the social proof side of things.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

Yeah, they were  basically using the same kind of ad formats, and then just updating them based off the season, right. So in all of our emails, instead of  the one that I'm looking at right now saying code WINTER, if we're about to do it right now, it would be SPRING, about to be SUMMER, right. So that same kind of structure is what we followed both in email and in ads, right. So this ad might be updated, what's new, creative, and before a little bit warmer weather, it might say, save $90 with code SPRING.

So we were really focused both on ads and email. Again, we didn't run the ads, but this was a strategy that was very consistent across both channels. That was very relevant and very timely, and because we had so many people on the west and so when people purchasing, it was okay for us to switch from one app to another because we were able to provide that social proof so quickly, it didn't really matter if we had 500 comments on a different ad, we could pretty quickly get 500 new comments on a new ad.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

Man, that is wild there. That's a cool concept. I just love how you can just do the spring, summer, winter fall. I mean, this is something you could do a couple times a year, which is just, you know, it's like having a one Black Friday sale or, hey, you could have three or four a year you know, it's one of those kind of concepts and make the most out of this. I love that style.

 


Guest: Chase Diamond  

Yeah, what I've found is, again, like we're very focused on the email side.   But what I've found on the email side, but also appears to be true on the Facebook side that a lot of our clients that we work with have really great lifestyle and product photography. So their ads, the stuff in the emails, everything is always so on brand. It's always so timely and so relevant. I think that's really been the key right in terms of differentiating is the fact that we're speaking to people the way that they want to be spoken to. Based off the current landscape of how people want to be spoken to, right? Obviously, with everything that just happened in the world, things are changing, and people are kind of catching up. And the smart marketers are able to have their pulse on what's coming. And then everyone else reacts, right?

 I think being  proactive and early on top of these trends on top of this craziness in the world, and obviously, having a sense of like, how should you display these things? And maybe maybe you should even take a pause for a few days and not display things, right. 

But I think being like, really great people, being really great marketers is knowing when to show things, and when not to show things. Knowing how people are going to feel. And we've always leveraged the user base, we've always asked customers for feedback. We've always asked customers to fill out surveys, we've always asked customers in Facebook groups that we have for our brands. Like how they feel.  What they're thinking.  And what would they think if we tried x y and z, right. So we're basically always testing our hypotheses around ads and email with a small group of  loyal VIP type folks, just so that way we can try to get other people's thoughts other than our own.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

Oh, yeah. What better way to get feedback from the customers directly? That's the frickin best way to do it there. Well, heck yeah. So we have the anatomy of a solid ad with a killer email all mixed into one. Let's go ahead and rip apart losing email on this side of things. Because with the way you have it set up on the anatomy of a losing ad, I want to dive into each one of these points to  gauge “Why didn't this work?” and how to make it better. 

And just so everybody kind of listening has some insights, we'll have the anatomy of a losing ad as well as a losing email and  a winning email with the breakdown of why and how to strategize there.  But let's dive into the anatomy of that losing email. He posted as well here.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond   

Awesome. Yeah, so you guys will get to see all this but with this losing email, what we noticed was that the header was only desktop friendly, right? So you absolutely have to start designing  to make sure that your emails look just as good on mobile if not better than they do on desktop, right? So in this current email, unfortunately, when we opened it on mobile, it just looks atrocious, right. And that's a huge mess. What we did notice over the kind of the COVID time, is a lot more of the traffic to our e commerce stores was on mobile, a lot more purchases were on mobile. So again, mobile mind.  Also, too, with this brand, they had a lot of their social icons and brand slogans at the very top of the email, and I feel that that's better suited at the footer.  We really want to keep the header  -- the first thing that people see  -- very simple, right? So just use your brand logo and your top nav navigation if needed, and then have everything else kind of any other noise towards the bottom right. People don't need to see your social icons at top. They don't need to see your brand slogan to top save that from the bottom. You're wasting really precious real estate. Does that make sense? So far?

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  16:00 

Yeah, that makes total sense, especially the whole desktop and mobile side of things. Because  I know we see a ton of conversions via mobile. So that's probably a huge indicator there on you know, big starts were, hey, making a mobile friendly and desktop friendly.  Gut with me being super email illiterate, can you actually have separate designs on the email mobile side versus email desktop side of things?  Or is it kind of kind of one size fits all there?  I really don't know. 


Guest: Chase Diamond  

Yeah, it kind of depends. Like, it depends on how you're building your emails, right?  Are your emails, mainly text based or emails, mainly image base? Is your email just literally one long image right? Is it slice and dice so it really just depends but in Klaviyo which is the ESP that we're using. ESP just means email service provider, or email marketing platform. You could actually render and switch between mobile and desktop previews. 

So we'll basically build first on desktop, and then we'll check the mobile preview. And then we'll make adjustments as needed. A lot of the times blocks and things do render properly, and they do transfer over fine. But there are other times where we'll notice something is kind of messed up or screwed up. And then we'll go in and specifically fix it on the mobile version without touching the desktop, right. 

So I'd say probably 75% of the work that we do is done on desktop and mobile in one go. And then the remaining 25% is just a second pass through the second look, some separate testing just to make sure that it does look really great on both. 

So then, going into this, this next part of the email again, you guys will see this. There's just a block of text, right. And our feedback here is basically using sub headers as needed to break up long body text. So when it's too much text, people aren't going to really read it, it's going to be confusing. So having some kind of text hierarchy is key. And that is done through incorporating fonts, a different weight, the different sizes and different colors. So again, this will make way more sense when you're actually looking at it. And you'll see that in a lot of these notes as well. 

And then also we say don't use all caps for the body. It works well maybe for a sentence or a few words. But anything more than using that it's just kind of difficult for users to digest, right? When everything's in caps, it makes it feel like everything is important. And having two paragraphs of everything that being important means really, nothing becomes important. Right? So that's also another tip. Does that make sense, guys?

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

Oh, yeah, that makes total sense there. So from your perspective, what would be the biggest thing to change on this losing email that you would make that would probably make the biggest impact in a positive manner there?

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

I think here,  it's just too busy looking at. They're trying to cram in way too much. And so few sections, right. I would probably, you know, really focus what's the goal of this email? Like, what is the key here? Because we don't really know what this email was trying to solve or trying to suggest. There's no call to action above the fold. Right? So people are wondering where do they click?  Where do they go? How do they know what to do? I think just really taking a step back and be like, what is our goal for this email?  Our goal is to get people to read this email and then they'll have info about our company. 

Okay, great. Cut out all the other noise in our goal to drive conversion, right? Okay, let's, let's make it conversion focused. Let's make it really simple to understand. Let's make the call to actions really clear. Let's provide people information or if they've just scan this, they understand it.  Is the call to action to get someone to go to the blog post?  Have a few sentences about the blog post or sentence from the blog post.  And then just have a really simple call to action that says, read more, right? I think keeping in mind user experience and designing for that is really important.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

That makes total sense there. I mean, when I see that big coupon looking thing in the middle of the email reminds me of those old school grocery store things you pull off the wall for the most part.


Guest: Chase Diamond  

That's crazy. And then kind of the last two things on this email is they have this product section where they talk about what's hot. And there's three different products they focus on. Our recommendation here is to give the product enough spacing, and give the text the ability to breathe. There's way too much information there without any differentiation. So you're not really too sure where to look or which one you want to focus on. Right? So it's again, it's just too noisy, it's too busy. And it's not built for mobile. 

So when you're when you're showing products,  keep it simple. You don't need to have every single reason why someone should buy that specific product or every single detail about it. Just give people enough that they want to click through. And then when they're on their site, they could see a really beautiful layout of the product land. 

And then lastly in this email, again, they stuffed everything in the header like there's now no footer information, right? There's this blob of gray space and openness, where it's a good place to have the details that you tried to get up moved to the bottom.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

Oh, yeah, that's a huge gray spot there. People can get lost in here pretty quick. Or even as you mentioned, you want to lead it to something to click through. I love the whole cliffhanger man mentality that makes them want to click through to where this one is just a ton of information without a doubt.

Guest:  Yeah, this is very quickly going to probably get deleted from people's inboxes. Right, like barko spam delete, like, I don't know what's happening here. 


Host: Zach Johnson  So, Chase when you say this is the Poor Ad here what were the results? Give us an a and b here of the night and day performance of winning and losing.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

Yeah, so this was a much older one because again,  there's no way in heck that we design and do these types of emails anymore. This way early on in our days. 

When we first started we really sucked mainly because my partner and I this time we're doing all the designs and thankfully to this day now we have a design team that's way better than we ever were or could ever be. 

But from memory, I think this email did decent on the open rates. I think it was like a, I don't know, like a 15% or 20% open rate, which is decent. And then I want to say like the click through was almost like it was close to zero.  Like it was probably 0.2 or something. I don't even know where people would have clicked, right. I don't know if we even had links on these images. Yeah, this was a hot mess.


 Host:  Zach Johnson   

That’s awesome. Also the Rich Ad here. What's that performing at? 


Guest: Chase Diamond   

Yeah, so the the ads related to the blanket that had a north of a 50% open rate and I think it had a 4% or 5% click through which is pretty decent, you know, a couple weeks after purchase --- especially when we're asking people to leave a review on a Facebook ad, right? Like no one really does. 


Host: Zach Johnson 4% or 5% click through on that and then your losing one is almost 0%.

 

Guest:  Chase Diamond

I think we got fired pretty quickly from that losing email. I think we're going to last in a few weeks or ...


Host: Zach Johnson

We're just saying you know, how much money did you lose on the on the Poor Ad and like you just lost the entire account, right?

 

Guest: Chase Diamond 

Yeah. They made no money and we had our retainer yanked.

 

 Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

There you go. And what was your retainer? 


Guest: Chase Diamond

Man back then it was cheap. Like they basically were paying them to work with us at that point.  


Host:  Zach Johnson   

Man this is so putting you in the poorhouse. I love it. They weren't even a profitable client. Email. If you were doing the design yourself. This is great. 


Guest: Chase Diamond

Yeah, so real quickly, my background is in cold email, like high volume, cold email building communities like looking scale. If communities acquired over a million or 2 million email subscribers through non paid acquisition. 

Yeah. And then Nick Shackleford, who I know you guys know, and a good buddy of mine, he's like, Dude, what are you doing on this cold email stuff? Like, this stuff is so spammy. You need to come into this e-commerce world.  I promise it's gonna be way better. 

So I came into the e-commerce world.  Nick sent me a course to take a quick course. It's like, dude, I'm so ready. I'm gonna crush this right on like a client. This one and one other. I think they literally are paying me like 250 bucks or 500 bucks, right? Like I was just begging for like experience and the case study. 

So thankfully, they didn't lose that much. Right. But it just created through the evolution of when I actually was designing the emails in my team, somebody asked me the day about it, right, like

 

Host:  Zach Johnson

That’s so awesome

 

Guest: Chase Diamond 

Yeah, so now we're charging a lot higher rates because our work is so refined.  And the funny thing is we have a really great reputation in the space of having the most beautifully designed emails.  So it's just really funny to see the evolution of where we were to where we are now like in a two to three year window.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter 

Oh yeah, and just so you have some context we'll be having this losing email or talking about as well as three or four top emails based off different products. So you'll be able to see some of these juicy ones he was talking about. Shoot, they would be ready in revenue.


Host: Zach Johnson 

I was talking about this Rich Ad email like what is that? What do you think the revenue is that that came off of that?

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

So related to the email have that access like that email itself asking for you is doing like two to $3,000 a month.  right Like the point of the email wasn't really even driving you again like granted sometimes in Klaviyo sometimes in platforms attributions, not 100% accurate so some of that came from other things but you know, it's been about a couple thousand dollars a month in revenue, the email itself, but the ad those two ads and I think they probably had a handful of other ads like I think they had about doesn't add that they had pretty much focused on and rotated between.

I mean, again, they were doing like seven figures a month in revenue, and a majority of their revenue was coming from Facebook and Instagram traffic. So I gotta imagine these ads were doing, you know, 10s of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars a month. 


Host: Zach Johnson

 And you know that you remember the monthly spend,

 or like, give or take?

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

Yeah, truthfully, we're not as kind of up to speed with how much customers are spending. And a lot of these customers scale pretty quickly.  Some of the numbers that they told us back then would change in weeks.  

Basically what happens is we've come into some of these brands, like this client, for example, that was doing some email, but not a ton of email. And we were then producing hundreds of thousands of dollars in new revenue that they never had every month. So they're able to go from $50,000 to $100,000 in the first couple months of working with us.  And I want to say now, they're pretty consistently spending, I would guess, mid six figures on ads a month.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

Yeah. I've seen some He's at all now. So I wouldn't be surprised there.

 

Host: Zach Johnson

So basically like this, you know, the high level strategy is like leverage your email to like hack your ad engagement and your comments.


Guest: Chase Diamond 

 Yeah, exactly. And then for this client also, they're based out of Australia, and in Australia, New Zealand and places like that...not the consumers here don't -- obviously consumers here go on places like Trustpilot and Yahoo. They look at reviews, they look at your phone, they look at all these things, right. But we found customers and other countries really look at review platforms very heavily. And that's how they make their decision. 

We're also in the same post purchase flow on the email side, after we asked for the comment on a Facebook ad. We also then were asking for a review on a third party review site, because we wanted to really jack up and increase those.  So after we had enough ads on our own website ... after this client had enough ads that had  100 reviews, 500 reviews, 1,000 reviews, like, at some point, they all become the same. 

So we started focusing the attention on the Facebook ads on the third party review sites. And we just started noticing over time,  we were just crushing it, like conversions would increase. And we never understood why until after we figured out the fact that customers that wanted to buy already consulted these sites, and as we built these sites up, and as we built the ads up, the whole conversion as a whole just increased. 

So yeah, it's using your email to harness the power of your customers to build you up on other platforms. That way you can keep building this ecosystem.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter  

Shoot, especially when you can bring in 20% or 30% of the overall revenue via email. I mean, that's a huge other area to really optimize and focus on without a doubt. So I mean, it's email stuff, it’s nowhere near dying.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond 

Yet if you think about another part of this software is ads blog, if you think about your email channel, right, other than whatever you pay your internal or your agency manager 

And whatever costs you pay for ESP, everything else obviously minus product costs and whatnot is profit, right? So we work with mainly seven, eight figure clients, as I mentioned, on the low end, our brands are probably doing $40k- $50k a month in email revenue on the high end, they're probably doing like, half a million dollars in revenue potentially even more. 

After you take out our cost of a couple thousand dollars a month, the cost of their email provider, a couple thousand dollars a month that the product costs but then they're literally sitting on 10s of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars a month in profit, that they're then able to reinvest back into the top of the funnel.  They're then able to reinvest into more inventory. They have all this extra cash that they could do whatever the heck they want with it, frankly.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

Oh, yeah. And that goes a long way with all that data.  Data is money in this industry without a doubt.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

Heck, yeah.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

So yeah, I mean, that was super juicy. I mean, we got the nitty gritty info on the kind of results. Where you know how those Poor Ad emails impacted your relationship with the clients. 

But it's cool to see how you've evolved over time because, I mean, I'm on your newsletter and I love seeing all these emails from random brands -- hey, this is a super sick one. I'm like, Man, I'm opening so many doors on the email sides of man. We love what you're doing over there that you're definitely the email king, but I pay attention to all of these. So I mean, shouts out right there.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond   

Thank you. I really appreciate that. Thank you.


Host:  Dylan Carpenter   

But heck yeah, I mean, everybody does a pretty good little one, they're diving into the email, some ad orientation there. But when it comes to that social proof, it'll make a difference on that bottom line, without a doubt. 

And on that Poor Ad side of things, the click through rate speaks for itself in comparison to that good email going to 4.5%  from not even 1%.  So I mean, that is an indicator there on what works and what doesn't work.

 

GuestChase Diamond 

Yeah, absolutely. And again, a shout out you'll see a bunch of really cool things like there's a winning email teardown and there's three or so email examples from our clients that performed really well in their four different use cases, so definitely check those out. And if anyone has any questions, feel free to hit me up. 


Host: Zach Johnson

How can people do that Chase? 


Guest: Chase Diamond 

Honestly, I'm like eight years late to the game, but I've been on a Twitter tear lately. So hit me up on Twitter. That's a platform that I'm sharing kind of daily tips and tricks. My username is ecom then chase diamond.  So ecom chase diamond. There you go.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter

Oh, yeah, definitely sign up for that newsletter, y'all because I mean, there is some juicy info in there and whether you do an email or not, I mean, you can definitely get some value out of this. I mean, I joined like three months ago, I don't even do email but I love looking through those. Sign up for that.

 

Guest: Chase Diamond  

Thank you.

 

Host:  Dylan Carpenter

Well, much appreciated for hopping on man. We love this. It was a different kind of outlook on the ads and email side. But hey, once again, man, thanks for taking the time to have some fun on this Rich Ad, Poor Ad podcast with us.

  

Guest: Chase Diamond    

Yeah, you guys. Thank you so much for having me. Enjoyed it as well.

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About The Podcast

Jason Hornung is the founder and Creative Director at JH Media LLC, the world’s #1 direct response advertising agency focusing exclusively on the Facebook ads platform. Jason’s proprietary methods for ad creation, audience selection and scaling are responsible for producing $20 million + of profitable sales for his clients EVERY YEAR

Zach Johnson

Zach Johnson is Founder of FunnelDash, the Agency Growth and Finance Company, with their legendary Clients Like Clockwork solutions. Under Zach’s leadership, FunnelDash has grown to over 5,000+ agency customers managing over $1 Billion in ad spend across 41,000 ad accounts on. Zach’s private clients have included influencers such as Dr. Axe, Marie Forleo, Dan Kennedy, Dean Graziozi to name a few. Zach is also a noted keynote speaker and industry leader who’s now on a mission to partner with agencies to fund $1 Billion in ad spend over the next 5 years.

Dylan Carpenter

Dylan Carpenter will be diving into what he and his team are seeing in 200+ accounts on Google and Facebook when it comes to trends, new offerings, and new opportunities. With over $10 million in Facebook/Instagram ad spend, Dylan Carpenter had the pleasure to work with Fortune 500 companies, high investment start-ups, non-profits, and local businesses advertising everything from local services to physical and digital products. Having worked at Facebook as an Account Manager and now with 5+ years of additional Facebook Advertising under my belt, I’ve worked alongside 60+ agencies and over 500+ businesses. I work with a team of Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn experts to continue to help companies and small businesses leverage the power of digital marketing.

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